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kerry today to replace outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we look at this first cabinet change for the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do eve
to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdrew her name. she'd faced republican criticisms over the benghazi terrorist attack. president obama made the announcement this afternoon at the white house. >> i am very proud to announce my choice for america's next secretary of state, john kerry. in a sense, john's entire life has prepared him for this role. having served with valor in vietnam, he understands that we have a responsibility to use american power wisely, especially our military power. and he knows, from personal experience, that when we send our troops into harm's way, we must give them the sound strategy, a clear mission, and the resources that they need to get the job done. in an extraordinarily distinguished senate career and as chairman of the foreign relations committee, john has played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years. as we turn the page on a decade of war, he understands that we've got to harness all elements of ame
was 78. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton will be back at work next week. she's been at home for three weeks, recovering from the stomach flu, when she fainted and suffered a concussion. clinton promised to testify next month before congress on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >>> former president h.w. bush is in intensive care, still in intensive care this morning. the 88-year-old is being treated for an elevated fever. doctors were initially treating bush for bronchitis and a cough when he was first hospitalized last month. his family says they are confidence he'll be released soon. >>> ford living up to its go further tag line. over the next two years the automaker says it will spend $773 million to expand six manufacturing plants in southeastern michigan. the investment will add more than 2,300 jobs in the state and it's part of ford's pledge in october to add 12,000 jobs and invest more than $6 billion in the u.s. by 2015. >>> sticking with our auto theme "consumer reports" is out with the list of best value cars. alison kosik at the new york stock ex
hillary clinton finally expected to return to work next week. she spent the last three weeks recovering from a stomach virus and concussion that forced her to miss her date to testify in the benghazi attack that killed four americans in september. lawmakers say until hillary clinton testifies, they'll hold up john kerry has confirmation for secretary of state. >> eric: joining us now is sout carolina congressman and member of the house foreign affairs committee, mr. jeff duncan. good to have you on. first of all, why haven't we heard from hillary clinton? i understand concussions. i know them all too well. but really? three, four weeks now to testify? >> well, she needs to testify and i think she will. i'm optimistic she will. her office verified she was ill. i know the travel schedule, she gets worn down. i'll give her the benefit of the doubt. she needs to come testify. she was the person in charge at the department of state on september 11 when the attack in benghazi happened. and there are questions that need to be answered. >> kelly: there have been some people who criticize
in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecog
sympathetic to conservative candidates. but they were very strong for jimmy carter, too. and for bill clinton, because they were southerners and themselves were of the faith and persuasions. but there were some of factors going on this time and this election. the obama team at the national level but at such a job, such an excellent job turning out its vote. the republican team did not. if you look at the same voters and how they are voting at state level and local level, you will get a different picture. we have a republican congress, a pretty conservative republican congress. people were comfortable voting for those folks. we look at governors, we have 30 republican governors now. so, many of the same people split their vote. they went for barack obama on the national level and when four republicans on local level. it is always more complicated. host: what is the future been like for the republican party? guest: we have no future. haven't you heard? we are done and finished. host: how do they deal on what seal -- guest: do have to argue for your point of view. i do not think we made a good a
. arguably he lost on the margins but ended up becoming president regardless. bill clinton did the same thing in 1992. the democratic party had a very negative image for the same reason. doing a poor job in terms of congressional leadership, which did very poorly, but then he cast a new image for the democratic party of what it represented and what it could be. that was the challenge coming into the election. the brand was so negative among folks in the middle and independent voters that somehow you need to craft a reason for people to trust republicans again, to give them the keys to the kingdom. i am not sure he ever successfully did that. i think the first presidential debate with the moment where it started. i think it was a bit late in the cycle 2 start rethinking their yen-- to start rethinking. the parties favorability is still much worse than the democrats. people see the republican party pretty negatively. even a fair number of republican-leaning voters do. i think the fundamental evidence is what people identify themselves as. for those of you who follow the polling, one of the big
jfk. back in the early 1960's. and he got a huge amount of protest. >> clinton lowered the capital gains tax and because of that a huge boom in the stock market. >> the tax cuts barely passed at the early part of 2000. why didn't they make them permanent and we could have avoid this had kind of discussion? >> tax policies extremely difficult. they put it through the so-called reconciliation process, which doesn't require 60 votes. reconciliation laws, sunset after ten years, they're not permanent and that's why this one is sunsetting, rather than having done a, you know, a long-term tax reform bill. and tax reform is very difficult. >> why can't we get sunsetting on spending, and no sunsetting on tax cuts. we shouldn't be, that's what we should be sunsetting are the spending bills. we should be talking about wind energy that needs to be sunsetted, soon. you bring up the side of the cliff that no one talks about. the sequester, the automatic spending reduction, i don't think it would be a bad thing if washington took the sequester and showed that they could cut spending. >> because
clinton and the congressional republicans. it seemed at that time it was advantage president or whoever it was in the white house. is that the same sort of scenario we're seeing right now or is it possible for this president to overplay his hand? >> i think we're defining dysfunction down. i mean, the willingness -- maybe we will get an 11th hour agreement that avoids the fiscal cliff, but it will be a fairly minimal agreement. nothing like a big comprehensive deal. especially the republicans are having difficulty making the compromises you need to move forward in what is a very closely divided society. what is the alternative? you have a republican house but a democratic president who will be there for four years and a reasonable prospect if hillary clinton runs in 2016, a democrat will hold the white house then. what are we waiting for. in 1997 even, when a democratic president was reelected along with a republican congress, they said none of us are going away, we have to make a deal. that's not really happening yet. >> so tglass is half full for you? >> i think it can still happen, b
and bill clinton can love it too. in "unthinkable" did the issue of torture become part of the debate? >> that's what it was. it was about taking the ticking clock scenario you're familiar with. the idea a man has put four nuke bombs on american soil, how far do you go to get it out of him? what are the lines you're prepared to go up to or beyond in order to to save the entire united states of america or everyone in it or do you have to negotiate with this man's human rights? so the film was a dramization of that. and again very difficult to read what the politics of it were. you can watch the entire film and again everyone has their own view of it and being the man who -- actually the film is about a cr i aagent who is working in iraq disappears and nobody knows where he is. he hops up in a mall in america and gives himself up and when he's brought in he says that he's converted to become a muslim and has put these bombs around the place. then sam jackson's character comes in and using torture and the whole film is about me being tortured by sam jackson and pushing you to see how far
last week nominated john kerry to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. here to walk us through the policeman call cause and effect in three states are "newshour" political editor christina and "roll call" we heard today that one of the kennedy h,irs, ted kennedy, junior, decided not to run for the seat in massachusetts, what's happening there? >> more of interesting dynamics at play. whenever a kennedy decides to run in massachusetts he sort of think that clears the field. so when he said he wanted to stay in connecticut, potentially run for something there one day -- >> ifill: which is where he lives. >> exactly. opens up the field for the democrats in a big way. really where everybody is paying attention right now the republican side. senator scott brown just lost the seat very high profile race in 2012 to elizabeth warren, should he choose to run for special election, try to repeat in 2010 to be able to catch democrats by surprise, that could be his seat. but he may not run. there are lot 6 different things at play, he has options down the line, always run for gov
an autobiography in which he takes great pride with president clinton having called him before he nominated me, before he nominee did justice breyer and said i'm thinking of the nominating ruth bader ginsburg and there would be okay with it. but it was that a bipartisan spirit read over three days but there were no hartel questions to speak to the constituents to show how they were and how well informed of the word. the white house was very concerned about the connection. i helped launch the project in the council for seven years there wasn't a single question about my affiliation. i think will take great statesman on both sides of the nile and it isn't one party or the other it was the dug confirmation and over 40 negative votes on elena kagn it would take people on both sides of the aisle to come together and say enough, this is not the way that we should be. we should be ruling judges, the president is devoted to the law to do the hard work that's involved that's what should count. there was a great man that set the truth and the role of the united states isn't to evil. it is the pendulum.
the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. secretary of state hillary clinton said she wanted to leave the job after president obama's first term. >>> well, a white christmas is in the forecast for some of us. but with it, we may see some unwanted weather. the midwest got its share this week with a blizzard in iowa and more than a foot of snow in wisconsin. the system that caused this is expected to dump inches in western pennsylvania and upstate new york today. as for christmas, the big day, let's check in with meteorologist alexandra steele. she has all the answers on who is going to see a white christmas. good morning, alexandra. >> good morning, everyone. good morning to you. meteorologically, a white christmas means there's an inch of snow on the ground christmas morning. doesn't have to be falling. just has to be there. look at this. who is going to see a white christmas? so many of us. certainly a lot better than last year if you want a white christmas. last year, western new york had brown ground. this year, that is not the case. so, from upstate new york all the way d
it was handled and everything that followed as a result. do you think this will tarnish hillary clinton's reputation at all as she leaves the administration, maria? >> i don't think that it will, randi. you know, the secretary herself is the first one to say that the buck stops with her. she has taken full responsibility for this. the state department with her at the head of it has accepted all 29 recommendations that came out of this report. she understands that there have been failures and that things need to change. and she has been the first to say that. she is going to testify next month about this. she is never one to either go back on her responsibility or to shy away if responsibility and make sure that from here on in those recommendations are accepted and that we do everything that we can to make sure that this does not happen again. so i don't think this will tarnish her. and we'll see what happens next month when she does testify. i'll think she will -- i think she will be able to answer all of the tough questions that will be put to her. >> amy, let me ask you and maria, i'
full eligibility. at hearkens it hearkens back to a proposal in the clinton health care era in allowing people as young as 60 or maybe even 55 at 1.2 by ian at the full actuarial cost. any reaction to that via any of the panelists? >> it makes much less sense given the passage of the affordable care act. i think the issue that had been dealt with previously is that because there are individuals who, for whatever reason, no longer have other sources of insurance coverage in their pre-medicare years, would it be okay to let them buy and on an unsubsidized basis to the medicare pool. we don't have to do that now because we have the affordable care act, which will make insurance via either medicaid or the exchanges available to people in a group setting. so it doesn't mean, you could think about technically doing it that it does not make a lot of sense. >> i totally agree and my first reaction too is such a proposal in today's context would actually make those individuals were soft when it was brought over to the medicare program with the same set of subsidies that would be available to tho
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)